The Stranger

Dear readers,

Now more than ever, The Stranger depends on your support to help fund our coverage. Please consider supporting local, independent, progressive media with a one-time or recurring donation. Our staff is working morning, noon, and night to make your contributions count.

Thank you and we are truly grateful for your support.

In light of coronavirus news and restrictions on gatherings put in place by Governor Inslee, Washington movie theaters have closed until further notice. We know, we're sad too! While we all practice social distancing in order to help flatten the curve of the virus, we'd suggest checking out our calendar of upcoming livestreamed events. Stay safe out there!

Midsommar

When we meet college student Dani (Florence Pugh), she's isolated, enduring a nerve-shredding family crisis behind a mask of feminine selflessness and apparently afraid to reveal her emotions to her distant and manipulative boyfriend, Christian. But once an affection-starved Dani, along with Christian and his bros, follow their friend Pelle to his cultish village in rural Sweden for a mysterious pagan festival, Midsommar blossoms into a flower of a different color. The Americans respond to their surroundings in varying ways: Christian and fellow PhD student Josh try to probe the village's secrets for academic glory, while douchey Mark ogles long-tressed local girls. Dani, meanwhile, wavers between unease with the cult's weird rituals and attraction to its sense of unshakable fellowship. Soon, they're all swept up in rites involving dancing, feasting, and tripping out, unaware that far more transgressive acts are being prepared. The ensuing narrative is expansive, a bit funny, full of elaborate invented culture, and overall less exhausting (and exhilarating) than director Ari Aster's Hereditary. Where Hereditary is about losing a family, Midsommar is about gaining one, a process that's a lot less wholesome than it sounds. by Joule Zelman
Showtimes & Tickets

Trailer

Credits
Director
Ari Aster
Cast
Florence Pugh, Jack Reynor, William Jackson Harper